Dromedary Camel

(Camelus dromedarius)

camel

Camels are mammals with long legs, a big-lipped snout and a humped back. There are two types of camels: dromedary camels, which have one hump, and Bactrian camels, which have two humps. Camels’ humps consist of stored fat, which they can metabolize when food and water is scarce.

In addition to their humps, camels have other ways to adapt to their environment. They have a third, clear eyelid that protects their eyes from blowing sand. Two rows of long lashes also protect their eyes. Sand up the nose can be a problem, but not for camels. They can shut their nostrils during sand storms.

Humans have used camels as a means of transport for thousands of years. They can carry about 375 to 600 lbs. (170 to 270 kilograms) on their backs, according to National Geographic. This earned these beasts of burden a nickname, “ships of the desert.”

Camels like to stay together in groups called herds. The herds are led by a dominant male, while many of the other males form their own herd called a bachelor herd. Camels are very social and like to greet each other by blowing in each other’s faces.

The wild Bactrian camel is considered critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and has a population that is decreasing. In fact, wild camels are one of the most endangered large mammals. According to the Wild Camel Protection Foundation, there are fewer than 1,000 wild camels alive.

On display at WILD VALLEY ADVENTURE PARK

Information collected from https://www.livescience.com/27503-camels.html

Pic from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dromedary_Camel_14.jpg